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About Postal Museum Japan

The Postal Museum Japan, displays and introduce collections related to postal service and communications. Its standing-exhibition zone employs displays and images divided into what are called Seven Worlds related to the story and history of postal service. In addition, the museum houses a zone for featured exhibitions, the Letter Lounge, an Event Space, Museum Shop, and Museum Post Office. Its exhibitions include a display of about 330,000 postage stamps, the largest such collection in Japan, and about 400 items related to Japanese and overseas postal-service administration.

On the basis of the idea of "Connecting Minds and the World," the museum employs digital technology to provide numerous opportunities to experience physically ways in which postal services and communications have a connecting effect on human minds.

Chronology of Postal Museum Japan

Though opened on March 1, 2014, under the management of Public Interest Corporation Tsushinbunka Association´╝łCommunications Culture Association´╝ë, the Postal Museum Japan, traces its origins back to the Yuubin Hakubutsukan (Postal Museum) founded by the former Ministry of Communications and Transportation in 1902 as part of the commemoration of the 25th anniversary of Japan's entry into the Universal Postal Union.

As part of the commemoration of the 25th anniversary of Japan's entry into the Universal Postal Union, the Postal Museum (Yuubin Hakubutsukan) was founded on the grounds of the Ministry of Communications and Transportation at what was then Kobikicho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo (current site of the Ginza Branch of Japan Post, Inc., 8-chome, Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo).
Construction of new offices for the Ministry of Communications and Transportation necessitated the relocation of the museum to the Communications Staff-training Center in Shiba Park
Because of the proposal to display reference materials not only on mail, telegraphs, and telephones, but also on the whole field of communications enterprises, including electricity, shipping, and channel markers, the name of the museum was changed from Yuubin Hakubutsukan (The Postal Museum) to Teishin Hakubutsukan (The Communications Museum.)
Upon completion of the new office building for the Ministry of Communications and Transportation, the museum was returned to its compound in Kobikicho, Kyobashi-ku. It occupied 9 rooms (726m2) on the first and second and part of the third stories on the left side of the building seen from the front.
Relocated to Fujimi-cho, Kojimachi-ku, (then Chiyoda-ku), the museum was expanded to include 13 display rooms to exhibit growing materials.
Hisoka Maejima (1835-1919), founder of the Japanese postal service, was born in Joetsu City, Niigata Prefecture. In 1931, the Maejima Memorial Museum was erected there to acquaint the public with his achievements.
The Maejima Memorial Museum was donated to the nation to be managed as an annex of the Communications Museum (Teishin Hakubutsukan).
As World War II grew increasingly violent, the museum display rooms were closed; and their major materials were evacuated to the Maejima Memorial Museum.
The Ministry of Communications was split into the Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications and the Ministry of Telecommunications. With this development, in keeping with the Ministry of Post and Telecommunications special measures law, the Communications Museum (Teishin Hakubutsukan) became an adjunct of the Ministry of Posts and Communications.
Tetsujiro Sakano (1873-1952) was referred to as the "Benefactor of postal-service revival." The Sakano Memorial Museum (Okayama City) was created in 1953 as an annex of the Communications Museum to familiarize the public with his achievements.
The Communications Museum (Teishin Sougou Hakubutsukan) was established in Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, under the joint management of four organizations: The Ministry of Post and Telecommunications (the current Japan Post Co., Ltd.); Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Public Corporation (current Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation); Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK); and Kokusai Denshin Denwa Co., Ltd. (current KDDI Corporation.)
Teishin Hakubutsukan 75-nen Shi (75-year history of the Communications Museum) published to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the museum's establishment.
The Okinawa Communications Museum opened to commemorate the 120th anniversary of Okinawa's postal administration and to publicize the history of postal services and communications in Okinawa from the period of the Ryukyu dynasty, (15th to 19th century), through World War II, and into the postwar period.
Elektriciteit, a manually operated electric generator and an embossing Morse telegraph device in the museum's collection officially designated Important Cultural Properties.
Four Breguet dial telegraph devices in the museum's collection officially designated Important Cultural Properties.
The Okinawa Communications Museum (Okinawa Teishin Hakubutsukan or OKICOMM) renamed the Okinawa Postal Museum.
TYK wireless phone in the museum's collection officially registered in the database of "important specimens from the history of science and technology".
The Communications Museum closed in connection with the redevelopment of Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo.
The new Postal Museum Japan, opened in Oshiage, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, under the management of the public interest incorporated foundation Tsushinbunka Association.
The Postal Museum (Yuubin Hakubutsukan) in 1902, located in the compound of the Ministry of Communications and Transportation (then Kobikicho, Kyobashi-ku).
The Postal Museum (Yuubin Hakubutsukan) in the precincts of the Communications Staff-training Center, in Shiba Park, in 1907.
The Ministry of Communications and Transportation (in what was then Kobikicho, Kyobashi-ku) in the early Taisho era, second decade of the twentieth century.
The Communications Museum (Teishin Hakubutsukan) in the end of the Taisho period, the late third decade of the twentieth century. Located in what was then Fujimi-cho, Kojimachi-ku.
Communications Museum (Teishin Sougou Hakubutsukan) Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo